Wholesale Da Hong Pao Sichuan Pepper (Szechuan Peppercorn, 大红袍花椒)

See all products

If you are purchasing for a restaurant, contact us (via envelope icon in menu) to receive a wholesale discount. Also, please contact us first for large orders.

Premium red Sichuan pepper (formerly Szechuan peppercorn) should have a strong citrusy fragrance and taste as well as an intense numbing quality. Ours is particularly potent, as it has not undergone the once-required heat-treatment process that for so long robbed Sichuan pepper of some of its punch. We believe we are the first to (legally) bring in untreated peppercorns, since Chinese suppliers uniformly heat-treat for the U.S. market. 

A member of the citrus family, the Zanthoxylum genus includes numerous edible species of both red and green Sichuan pepper. The most famous red "hua jiao" was historically grown in Hanyuan County, Sichuan, but just as popular—if not more so—in Sichuan nowadays is the da hong pao species grown in Gansu and other northern China provinces.

Da hong pao, or big red pao, is the Sichuan pepper flavor profile most of us are familiar with. It is warm and woodsy compared to Hanyuan's bright lemony tartness. It is also larger and brighter red than Hanyuan.

This big red pao is a single-origin spice grown in the Wudu area of Gansu Province and is from the 2018 harvest. It is a premium product, sorted to include mostly opened seed pods and few stems and seeds, which appear in abundance in lower-quality Sichuan pepper. The harvested peppercorns go directly from farmer to our supplier in Chengdu for processing, and meet strict U.S. safety standards. 

To learn more about the history of Sichuan pepper in the U.S. and current sourcing in China, read this article we reported for Roads & Kingdoms. 

Source: Grown in Wudu, Gansu Province
Ingredients: Sichuan pepper only. No additives or preservatives. Non-irradiated and non-heat-treated. 
Size: 1 kilogram (2.2 pound) bag
 

From "These 10 Great Online Specialty Food Stores Have Everything" in Bon Appetit:

[The Mala Market] offer crazy good Sichuan peppercorns, which are complex, intense, and citrusy—as opposed to the bunk ones, which are bitter, not as aromatic, and lacking that crucial mouth-numbing quality.—Mari Uyehara